Semi-Official Results
Yes votes:
4,439,380 (62.5%)
No votes:
2,659,828 (37.5%)

Proposition 28 requires the state to provide additional funding to public schools (including charter schools) to increase arts instruction and/or arts programs.

According to analysis from the Legislative Analyst's office, the amount provided each year would be equivalent to 1 percent of the total Proposition 98 funding provided to K-12 schools in the prior year. This annual funding amount is commonly referred to as the minimum guarantee.

In 2023-24, Proposition 28 funding would be considered a supplementary payment above the Proposition 98 minimum guarantee provided to schools.The minimum guarantee would be adjusted upwards to reflect the additional funding required by the measure. This proposition allows the Legislature to reduce the allocation for arts education in a year when the Legislature suspends the minimum guarantee. When this is the case, the percentage reduction in funding for arts education shall not exceed the percentage reduction in total funding to schools.

Proposition 28 also allocates a greater proportion of the funds to schools serving more economically disadvantaged students.  The proposition requires schools with 500 or more students to use at least 80 percent of the additional funding to hire staff, provide training, and purchase supplies and materials. Under the measure, school principals will decide how funds are spent. Finally, Proposition 28 limits the use of funds on administrative costs and mandates that local governing boards certify each year that the funding their schools received was spent on arts education. 

This measure was put on the ballot by petition signatures.

Fiscal Impact

Proposition 28 would increase state costs around $1 billion annually for arts education.

What Your Vote Means

According to the California State Legislative Analyst’s office:

YES vote on this measure means: The state would provide additional funding specifically for arts education in public schools. This amount would be above the constitutionally required amount of funding for public schools.

NO vote on this measure means: Funding for arts education in public schools would continue to depend on state and local budget decisions.

Official Voter Information

Non-Partisan Resources

Public Opinion

USC Schwarzenegger Institute – USC Price California Issues Poll Fall 2022 General Election Poll, November 4, 2022, pp. 15-16, 52.

Pro

The proponents of Proposition 28 say that California has so drastically cut arts programs, that new funding must be provided. They reference statistics that show that students who have arts and music eduction do better in other subjects such as math and reading. They believe the measure provides the necessary safeguards to insure the funds are spent as intended.

Con

No argument against proposition 28 was submitted for the November 8 ballot.

Opponents

None at this time.